slideshow 1 Embroidered Kashmir Shawls: 5 Tips for Wearing In Spring

Life Springs Eternal: Beautiful Kashmir Shawl

 

Embroidered Kashmir shawls are staples of winter fashion but the change of season doesn’t mean that they can’t figure prominently in your choice of what to wear. Quite the contrary and if you are anything like our customers, you are always looking for some helpful ideas on how best to wear an embroidered Kashmir shawl in seasons other than winter. This short article will give you five solid and helpful tips for making the best of the shawls in your collection. The tips are particularly aimed for spring time, but you can easily adopt them to other seasons of the year. And, if by chance you don’t own a shawl, there’s a special note at the end with advice on how you can change that.

So, in particular order, here are the five tips for making the best of your embroidered Kashmir shawls during spring.

Snow White in San Francisco Shawl Embroidered Kashmir Shawls: 5 Tips for Wearing In Spring

Snow White in San Francisco Shawl

 

Tip #1 – Select lighter colored shawls

We know from the boffins in lab coats that darker colors tend to absorb and retain heat compared to lighter ones. This science fact is helpful to shawl wearers because it can help make transition from the biting cold of winter, to the crisp and inviting winds of spring. In this regard you should bring those lighter colors to the front of your wardrobe. Of course, you can add a bigger boost of comfort to your wardrobe by wearing those shawls that have lighter, more airy fabric. Lastly, rolled into this tip is the aspect of timing.

Tip #2 – Be dynamic in how you wear shawls

The good thing about embroidered Kashmir shawls is that you have endless ways of wearing them and the style can be very flexible. If you are making your way down to the shops or to pick up the kids, a shawl can still add a bit of elegance to your look. All you have to do is transform it into scarf. Many of the fine pieces we offer can help you make this switch

Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Shawl Seasons The Kashmir Company Embroidered Kashmir Shawls: 5 Tips for Wearing In Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Shawl – Seasons – The Kashmir Company

effortlessly. In the evenings shawls can then take on their more appropriate roles and you can simply wear it around your shoulders as a wrap.

Tip #3 – Make your shawls compliment everything you wear

Embroidered Kashmir shawls beyond the fact that they can double as scarfs are also very dynamic in terms of what they can be worn with. From this perspective you mustn’t shy away from wearing your shawls with your spring dress, casual shirts, jeans and formal gowns. The fashion world is really your oyster in this regard and by mixing and matching in this way, you keep a consistent fashion identity and a splendid sense of style.

Tip #4 – Ad versatility with different styles

There are many ways that women wear embroidered Kashmir shawls, and most have their own favorite style. It really does depend on what look you are trying to achieve but the simple way of draping it over your shoulder is a quick way to accessorise and get out and about. The more you learn though, the more dynamic you’ll look and feel so it helps to take some study of the most popular ways of wearing a shawl. We covered a few ways to wear an embroidered Kashmir shawl some time ago and you can take a look to see which style best suits your needs.

Tip #5 – Combine shawls and create something unique

For really small shawls you can go one step further creatively and twist two shawls together, creating something unique and spectacular. There are really no hard and fast rules on this one. As long as you follow the basic rules above of selecting scarves that are light both in color and texture you should have no problem coming up with something stunning.

Azure Blue Ivory Secret Garden Shawl Seasons Kashmir Company Embroidered Kashmir Shawls: 5 Tips for Wearing In Spring

Azure Blue Ivory Secret Garden Shawl – Secret Garden Collection

Your spring time wardrobe will pop now that you are aware of these functional and helpful tips for wearing an embroidered Kashmir shawl. And, as mentioned at the beginning, if you don’t own a shawl you simply must add a few to your wardrobe in order to make the best of this timeless fashion accessory.

The Kashmir Company is a purveyor of the best embroidered Kashmir shawls in the world and such as we like to help people get into shawl-wearing. You can match the five tips above with a beautiful Kashmir shawl right now. All you have to do is visit either of our stores and make a selection from our varied and spectacular collection of embroidered Kashmir shawls.

Je Ne Sais Quoi Pink Ivory Shawl Seasons The Kashmir Company Embroidered Kashmir Shawls: 5 Tips for Wearing In Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Pink Ivory Shawl – Seasons – The Kashmir Company

Here are the links:

http://kashmircompany.com (main store)

http://kashmirseasons.com (store showcasing the very best shawls for seasonal fashion)

 

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Blog Post Image Mothers Day Collection Kashmir Collection Gifts For Mothers Day: Give Her A Kashmir Shawl To Show Your Love

Beautiful Kashmir Shawls and Scarves for Mother’s Day

 

Your mother deserves to be treated like the gem she is so go all the way this Mother’s Day. We’ve put together a collection designed to help you select the perfect gift for the mother you love. Stunning colors, vibrant and harmonious motifs complete a marvelous collection of gifts for Mothers Day.

Browse the Mother’s Day collection by clicking the link below.

http://www.kashmirseasons.com/collections/mothers-day-gift-collection

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Kashmir Silk Scarves: Secrets of the Fashionistas

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Lavender Fog Paisley Silk Scarf / Shawl

 

Few fashion accessories are able to transform an outfit quite like Kashmir silk scarves and for well over a century, fashion trendsetters have relied on this timeless piece of fashion must-haves. Kashmir silk scarves are essentially a woman’s way to achieve an elegant and luxurious look without much effort. Most icons of fashion have used the Kashmir silk scarf to define their own unique sense of style, grace and charm.

There are few places you’ll see the Kashmir silk scarf on display like around the necks (or heads of) of Hollywood celebrities. In fact, it’s the efforts of early trend setters like Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn and Sophia Loren which has etched the Kashmir silk scarf firmly into the fashion consciousness of the modern and trendy woman.

Sophia Loren scarf Kashmir Silk Scarves: Secrets of the Fashionistas

Sophia Loren scarf

audrey hepburn scarf Kashmir Silk Scarves: Secrets of the Fashionistas

Audrey Hepburn Head Scarf

But Kashmir silk scarves are not all about celebrity appeal and vicarious living. In addition to these built-in qualities Kashmir silk scarves have remained highly functional. You can see trendy fashionistas wearing silk scarves virtually in any setting. Women who have an appreciation for timeless fashion will wear a Kashmir silk scarf on occasion that a ‘statement’ needs to be made. It’s not uncommon to see a woman doing her food shopping in upscale cities like London and New York with a Kashmir silk scarf neatly wrapped around her neck. A glance at the fashionistas streaming out of a Broadway theatre in New York will yield a potpourri of Kashmir silk scarves—all radiating the charm and elegance of their wearer.

What makes Kashmir silk scarves so different?

Any discerning woman who enjoys timeless fashion and history will tell you that not all silk scarves are created equal. Today with mass-production being what it is, you have to take a really careful approach when selecting and buying silk scarves. A wrong choice will almost always lead to fading colors, frayed ends and poor embroidery.

Kashmir silk scarves sets themselves apart by offering unmatched quality in all these areas. Scarves made in Kashmir are given the same expert attention that the region has produced for more than 300 years. This strong culture developed at time when Shawls were the fashion accessory of European royalty. As such each scarf that is made in Kashmir is made painstakingly by hand, dyed delicately by hand and put to the dry under nature’s bountiful giver of life—the sun.

jackie o Kashmir Silk Scarves: Secrets of the Fashionistas

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis scarf

Enduring appeal and celebrity icons

Today Kashmir silk scarves are no less popular than they were back in the heydays of Grace Kelly and Audrey Hepburn. A new generation of celebrities and socialites have picked up the mantle of high-fashion and the discerning woman can follow the lead of a bevy of Hollywood trendsetters. Women like Angelina Jolie, Julia Roberts, Jessica Alba and others seem to have made Kashmir silk scarves a permanent part of their dress code and fashion identity.

These icons have also done justice to the functionality and flexibility of Kashmir silk scarves and Jessica Alba for one has been snapped hundreds of times wearing a silk scarf whilst out with her children or engaging in other leisurely activities.

Kashmir silk scarves and our commitment

Hollywood celebrities do their part in wearing and showcasing the best Kashmir silk scarves but we here at the Kashmir Company do our part in supplying the enduring quality that makes silk scarves stand the test of time. We are committed to preserving the legacy of expert and authentic scarf-making and work tirelessly to bring the very latest trends and motifs in the world of Kashmir silk scarves.

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Lavender Fog Paisley Silk Scarf / Shawl

We call it the ‘Kashmir Company treatment’ and you can see it on display in every scarf on display across our various collections. Right now we are showcasing our Spring Collection and you can take a look by clicking here.

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Laduree Silk Collection Seasons Paris Kashmir Company 1024x576 Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection: Inspired by Laduree Paris

Laduree Silk Scarf Collection

 

Paris is famous for many things; there are cafés, fine restaurants, lots of gothic architecture and Laduree shop 300x224 Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection: Inspired by Laduree Paris macaroons! These delightful sweet meringue-based confectioneries are now famous around the world because of the world-famous French patisserie called Laduree.

What Laduree has done is given the macaroon an aesthetic appeal and many people when they see one for the first time are unsure of what to do. “Do I wear these little jewels are eat them?” That’s a typical dilemma and one look at macaroons made by Laduree show you why. Wrapped in some of the most eye-popping and soul-enchanting pastel colours, no two macaroons are ever alike. From baby pink to minty green, one look at Laduree macaroons will make you fall hopelessly in love visually.laduree paris macroons kashmircompany 300x296 Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection: Inspired by Laduree Paris

This brings us to the Kashmir Seasons’ spring collection, for it is this beautiful and timeless array of pastel colors that inspired the company’s founder to create designs in the colors that you see in our main online store.  The founder, on one of his many visits to Paris became inspired after a casual visit to the Laduree patisserie.  While inside, the idea of merging the ancient and timeless art of Kashmiri shawl making with the beautiful colors of Laduree macaroons was born.

The beautiful yet subtle and captivating colors of the macaroons were the kernel for the delightful works of art presented in the Kashmir Seasons spring collection. Each shawl or scarf in our spring collection has been infused with the lush and rich colors of pastel. Layered on top of such beautiful and timeless color selection are the enduring craftsmanship of the finest and most timeless and artistic embroidery from the beautiful and wonderful region of Kashmir.

Laduree Silk Collection Seasons Paris Kashmir Company detail 1024x576 Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection: Inspired by Laduree Paris

Laduree Silk Collection

 

A few shawls are worth mentioning here and a fitting place to start is with the Crème de Menthe Paisley Silk Scarf / Shawl. Decked in the finest and most delicate embroidery you can find the Crème de Menthe Paisley Silk Scarf / Shawl has been delicately coated with the subtle but enriching color of mint-green.

Crème de Menthe Paisley Silk Scarf Shawl Seasons Kashmir Company Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection: Inspired by Laduree Paris

Crème de Menthe Paisley Silk Scarf Shawl – Seasons – Kashmir Company

 

We also have to mention the beautiful Lavender Fog Paisley Silk Scarf / Shawl which was inspired by the timeless lavender color of one of Laduree’s best-selling macaroons. Versatile and dynamic, the Lavender Fog Paisley Silk Scarf / Shawl will add timelessness and artistic flair to any wardrobe. It will also add the liveliness of spring and add the chirpiness that comes with the procession of the equinox, a time for renewal and rebirth.

Lavender Fog Paisley Silk Scarf Shawl Seasons Kashmir Company Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection: Inspired by Laduree Paris

Lavender Fog Paisley Silk Scarf Shawl – Seasons – Kashmir Company

 

L’amour Paisley Silk Scarf Shawl Seasons Kashmir Company Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection: Inspired by Laduree Paris

L’amour Paisley Silk Scarf Shawl – Seasons – Kashmir Company

 

You are invited to browse our spring collection and enjoy the delightful and enchanting pastel motifs that we’ve put together for the discerning woman of timeless fashion and luxurious taste.

Ladurée Silk Scarf Collection >>

 

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Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Shawl

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Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Shawl

 

Our Je Ne Sais Quoi shawl collection has many captivating pieces and few takes hold of the imagination and the senses like the Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Shawl.

http://www.kashmirseasons.com/collections/je-ne-sais-quoi-shawl-collection/products/je-ne-sais-quoi-blue-ivory-kashmir-shawl

 

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Je Ne Sais Quoi Aspen Green Shawl

 

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Je Ne Sais Quoi Aspen Green Shawl

Aspen green for a timeless you. Express your joy for spring with the Je Ne Sais Quoi Aspen Green Shawl.

http://www.kashmirseasons.com/collections/je-ne-sais-quoi-shawl-collection/products/je-ne-sais-quoi-aspen-green-shawl

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JeNeSaisQuoiCollection BLUE WEB FRAME WEB 885x590 Je Ne Sais Quoi: Give Your Wardrobe That “It” Factor This Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Kashmir Shawl

 

What’s makes a woman stand out in a crowd? This question has lingered for thousands of years and philosophers as timeless as Plato have struggled to come up with a suitable answer. The French just say she has a certain “Je Ne Sais Quoi.” Translated in English it means quite literally: “I don’t know what,” and this mystic, this searching desire to define is the inspiration for our Je Ne Sais Quoi line of shawls.

The beautiful and timeless pieces that you find in our spring collection are a testament to the founder of the company who believes in helping women who can’t decide what to wear.

JeNeSaisQuoiCollection PINK WEB FRAME WEB 885x590 Je Ne Sais Quoi: Give Your Wardrobe That “It” Factor This Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Pink Ivory Kashmir Shawl

With this boundless desire and inspiration to help, the goal is to ensure that as a discerning woman of timeless fashion, the right selection of “what to wear” can be made in the blink of an eye. Of course, if you do wear one of these shawls, you’ll no doubt stand out and when people remark of your ‘Je Ne Sais Quoi,’ you and only you will know the real secret.

The Je Ne Sais Quoi collection is also for mothers and the woman who has grown graceful in age. The pastel and white/ivory colors are perfect since they provide the warmth and comfort that only pastel and white can give. As a gift to a mother you can do no better than one of these timeless and beautiful shawls.

Each shawl in the collection has been designed, colored and embroidered with allure in mind. We have gone above and beyond especially where colors are concerned and everything from subtle creams and lavender to the much bolder greens peppered with the a rainbow of colors have gone into making Je Ne Sais Quoi collection a sight to behold.

JeNeSaisQuoiCollection PURPLE WEB FRAME WEB 885x590 Je Ne Sais Quoi: Give Your Wardrobe That “It” Factor This Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Lavender Ivory Kashmir Shawl

Of course each shawl comes with the usual Kashmir Company staples so the timeless and artistic beauty that emanate from the lush and historic region of Kashmir enriches every piece in the collection. The Je Ne Sais Quoi Aspen Green Shawl piece for instance, comes with a rich tapestry of floral motifs that draws you in and rewards you with stunning aesthetic appeal. The green reminds you of the effervescent charm of nature and the crisp breeze that makes spring an equinox worthy of unending praise.

Your wardrobe will thank you for breathing fresh life through our Je Ne Sais Quoi line of shawls. Each time you wear a shawl from the collection you’ll be guaranteed a splendid reception. You’ll glow under the adoration and praise that comes with wearing such artistic and timeless beauty—genuine works of art that have helped define fashion for hundreds of years.

There’s a color for everyone so why not add your slice of Je Ne Sais Quoi to your wardrobe today.

Je Ne Sais Quoi Pink Ivory Shawl Seasons The Kashmir Company Je Ne Sais Quoi: Give Your Wardrobe That “It” Factor This Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Pink Ivory Shawl – Seasons – The Kashmir Company

Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Shawl Seasons The Kashmir Company Je Ne Sais Quoi: Give Your Wardrobe That “It” Factor This Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Blue Ivory Shawl – Seasons – The Kashmir Company

 

 

Je Ne Sais Quoi Mimosa Ivory Shawl Seasons The Kashmir Company Je Ne Sais Quoi: Give Your Wardrobe That “It” Factor This Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Mimosa Ivory Shawl- Seasons – The Kashmir Company

 

 

Je Ne Sais Quoi Lavender Ivory Shawl Seasons The Kashmir Company Je Ne Sais Quoi: Give Your Wardrobe That “It” Factor This Spring

Je Ne Sais Quoi Lavender Ivory Shawl – Seasons – The Kashmir Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Shah Jahan and His Enduring Legacy of Love

Every year close to three million people visit the Taj Mahal—the world’s most enduring symbol of love. The huge numbers are a testament to the power of love and how it permeated India at the time.

The Taj Mahal Agra from the Garden published 1801 colour litho Daniell Thomas 1749 1840 William 1769 1837 Private Collection The Bridgeman Art Library Shah Jahan and His Enduring Legacy of Love

The Taj Mahal, Agra, India. 1801 (colour lithograph), Daniell, Thomas (1749-1840) & William (1769-1837)

This legacy of love has given Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India, a permanent fixture on the travel itineraries of Westerners.

The Taj Mahal is symbolic of love but it is also a remarkable work of architecture and engineering. The intricate and ornate designs that have come to symbolize this marvellous piece of architecture, to be fully understood require some context. This is the story of the Taj Mahal.

Shah Jahan and His Love

On 17 June 1631 Mumtaz Mahal, the second wife of the Great Mogul Shah Jahan (reigned 1628-66), died in childbirth. Deep sorrow and tender love inspired the ruler to erect a mausoleum: the famous Taj Mahal. It was built according to the ancient Vasati laws of spatial energy in Agra, the capital of his kingdom.

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Top of the cenotaph buil pre-1643 by the Great Mughal Shah Jahan for his second wife Mumtaz Mahal. It is decorated with inlays pf precious and semi-precious stones. Taj Mahal, Agra, India. c 1640

Being a lover of precious stones such as the diamonds known as ‘Grand Mogul’ (280 carat) and ‘Shah’ (88.7 carat), he had the cenotaph and the nearby marble lattices decorated with the most valuable material he could imagine: inlaid minerals in the Parchin kari technique. He was hoping that the lucky and magical powers of the stones would keep him and his wife together after death.

As Francois Bernier, a French physician and traveller, who became a personal physician of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb for around 12 years during his stay in India wrote in a letter dated 1663: “Every-where you look you see jade… jasper and other, rare precious kinds of stones, cut, combined and inlaid in marble in a hundred different ways.” However, the jewels brought Shah Jahan no luck. Not the amber from Burma, the lapis lazuli from Afghanistan, the jade from the Chinese Turkestan, nor the minerals carnelian, agate, amethyst, jasper, emerald, chaceldony or onyx from the different regions of the Indian subcontinent saved him. He was deposed in 1658 by his son Aurangzeb (reigned 1658 – 1707). He was not allowed to leave the Red Fort of Agra. Eight years later, following his death, he was buried next to his wife in the Taj Mahal.

It is this enduring story of love, passion and commitment that has made the Taj Mahal the enduring and timeless symbol it is today. The magnificent diamonds used in creating Shah Jahan’s vision of love has helped making diamonds an enduring symbol of love. The wide influence of the fashion of the time has also helped make Kashmiri shawls a timeless expression of love. Both diamonds and shawls are now used to express love.

end of post Shah Jahan and His Enduring Legacy of Love

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Kashmiri shawls have been at the heart of high fashion and sophistication for hundreds of years. Its influence is attributed to not just the timeless conceptualization of fashion but also the design and motifs that has come to adorn much of the fashion accessories that graced the wardrobes of fashion icons throughout the centuries.

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Paisley Buta. c 1680. Kashmir Design. A slender plant design derived from persian floral ornament with the naturalism of Mughal art.

From Empress Josephine to One such motif is the Paisley, and its emergence of a deeply set part of Kashmir shawls can be traced as far back as the 1500s. The evolution and contribution of this eternal motif will be explored so that a more complete understanding of the Paisley motif can be had.

Early Beginnings of the Paisley

By the end of the 17th century the timeless motif of the Paisley began to take shape. Its inclusion on the surface of Kashmir shawls started as a slender flowering plant with roots and the original name given to the motif in Kashmir was ‘buta‘ or ‘boteh‘ (a western adaptation of the word buta). There’s some dispute among historians over the origins of this early plant design but the general consensus is that it had Persian origins. This Persian origin was fused with the artistic themes of Mughal art and by the 18th the motif took on a richer decorative and ornate design. More flowers were added to the design and the Persian influence became even more pronounced with the replacement of the roots with the well-known Indo-Persian decorative motif, the vase-of-flowers.

The grand Paisley design we see today emerged as a part of design inspiration of shawl makers in the 17th century. During the period of the Mughal Emperor Akbar (r. 1556–1606), shawl making underwent a massive growth spurt.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – ca Early 17th Century.

Paisley Kashmir Shawl Shoulder Mantle Mughal Period early 17th century 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Early Buta on Kashmir Shawl used as Shoulder Mantle – Mughal Dynasty.  ca Early 17th Century.

Patka Shoulder Mantle Mughal Dynasty Late 17th Century Brocaded with silk thread and gold thread Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on a Patka – Shoulder Mantle. Mughal Dynasty. ca Late 17th Century. Brocaded with silk thread and gold thread. ca Early 17th Century.

Buta on Shoulder Mantle on a Pala Kashmir Shawl Mughal Dynasty 17th Century  574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on a Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir Pala Shawl. Mughal Dynasty. ca 17th Century

Akbar conquered Kashmir in 1568 and took great interest both in the design and production of Kashmiri shawls as a symbol of love and royal status. He commissioned the construction of workshops dedicated to the manufacture of Kashmiri shawls and went as far as directing his aides to make specific inputs into the way shawls were woven and dyed.

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Paisley Buta. c 1700-1730. Kashmir Design. The design evolved in early eighteenth century to more formal motif as the number of flowers increased.

The evolution continued well into the 19th century where the shape hardened into the now well-known Paisley pine cone but its popularity in Europe and the rest of the world was due in large part to the booming shawl trade. By the time Paisley became popular in Europe the motif had reached its design and artistic zenith.

The Booming Shawl Trade (Asia 1500 – 1800)

The boteh developed in Kashmir under the watchful eye of the Mughals and their design aides but its spread and eventual morphing into the iconic Paisley design was down entirely the trade in shawls and demand for these pieces of timeless Kashmiri fashion. From Delhi to Istanbul the Kashmir shawl became a symbol of love and high fashion and demand grew almost exponentially from the early 1500s to the late 1800s. Traders travelled to Kashmir to acquire these timeless pieces and took them as far as Iran where they were worn by the wealthy women; in Russia and places like Turkestan, the Kashmir shawl was seen as the must-have fashion accessory and this fuelled popularity which eventually swept across Europe and the rest of the world. Early traders had no interest in reproducing the beauty and elegance of Kashmir shawls in their own locals but the time European traders got into the heart of the shawl trade things changed.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – ca 1700-1730.

Buta on Shoulder Mantle on Kashmir Shawl Mughal Dynasty 17th Century 1700 1730 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Shoulder Mantle on Kashmir Shawl. Mughal Dynasty. ca 1700 -1730.

Buta on Shoulder Mantle Mughal Dynasty 17th Century 1700 1730 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Mughal Dynasty. ca 17th Century.

Buta on Waist Band Mughal Dynasty 17th Century 1700 1730 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Waist Band. Kashmir Shawl. Mughal Dynasty. ca 17th Century.

 

Travellers like William Moorcroft despatched Kashmiri weavers to England with the hope that they’d be able to reproduce the stunning and artistic pieces that were so effortlessly made in the Kashmir valley. At its height the trade in Kashmir shawls saw no fewer than 120,000 weavers and artisans making a living from the industry.

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Paisley Buta. c 1700-1730. Kashmir Design. The design started to evolved further into an abstract motif due to the complex nature of the designs being started to be woven on Kashmir shawls.

The burgeoning shawl trade led naturally to an entrepreneurial interest and as shoulder-mantles became popular wealthy business interests started to find ways of imitating much of the art and design of Kashmiri shawl making. Shawl making centres were set up across Europe and places like Norwich in England, and Paris in France started to weave imitations of timeless Kashmiri art. The Paisley had pivotal growth during this time.

English shawl makers had already started to reproduce on a wide scale many of the motifs that came to define Kashmir shawls but the emergence of a shawl making workshop in Paisley, central Scotland became the centre of European shawl making. Paisley shawl making proved so popular it eclipsed the Jacquard loom perfected in France to become the de facto name associated with the boteh. Eventually the boteh gave way to the name ‘Paisley’ and this has remained to this day. It is important to point out though that Kashmiri shawl makers have never sought to move away from the original name and even today the well-known pine cone shape is still called buta in Kashmiri or ‘badaam’  like shape of a almond seed. Kashmiri artisans to this day approach the fine art of shawl making with the skill, dedication and passion of their counterparts centuries ago. From this perspective the boteh/Paisley has come full circle and demonstrates the timeless nature of Kashmiri design and creativity.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – ca 1700-1730.

Buta on Shoulder Mantle Mughal Dynasty Early 18th Century 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir. Mughal Dynasty, ca Early 18th Century.

Buta on Shoulder Mantle Mughal Dynasty Mid 18th Century 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir. Mughal Dynasty. Mid 18th Century.

Buta on Shoulder Mantle Afghan Period Mid to late 18th Century 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Waistband. Afghan Period. Kashmir. Mid 18th Century.

 

The shawl industry had a marginal decline near the end of the 19th century but that didn’t dampen the enduring appeal of Kashmir shawls. Today they are as popular as ever and though they are more accessible, they’ve lost none of the ostentatious appeal that made them the choice of European and Asian royalty. The Paisley has transcended the ages too and today its timeless appeal and symbol of love can be found any everything that has a connection to high-fashion, class and extravagance.

Kashmir has once again taken its rightful place as the purveyor of the Paisley design and shawl purists now rely on gatekeepers of shawl making authenticity to supply them with the very best Kashmir Paisley shawls. The Kashmir Company has continued to be a part of that rich history and the rich tapestry of the Paisley is an integral part of the beautiful and timeless shawls that form our exclusive paisley shawl collection.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – c 1740-1770

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Paisley Buta. c 1740-1770. Kashmir Design. Buta design was established as a predominant motif on the Kashmir shawl.

 

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Buta on Patka – Shoulder Mantle Afghan Period. Kashmir. Late 18th Century.

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Buta on Patka – Shoulder Mantle Afghan Period. Kashmir Shawl. Loom woven Pashmina. Late 18th Century.

Buta Waist Band Afghan Period late 18th Century  574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta Waist Band. Kashmir shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. Loom woven Pashmina. Late 18th Century.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – c 1770-1800

Paisley Motif KashmirShawl 1770 1800 627x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Paisley Buta. c 1770-1800. Kashmir Design. Complexity of the Buta design increased as the demand by royals increased. More refined designs with complex buta motif evolved.

 

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1815 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1815

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1815. 2 575x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1815.

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1815. 3 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Shoulder Mantle. Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1815.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – c 1815 onwards.

Paisley Motif KashmirShawl 1815 onwards 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Paisley Buta. c 1815 onwards. Kashmir Design. Most of Kashmiri Shawls created for markets like Russia, Persian, India and Europe has buta design as a standard. Buta motif was brand onto itself and a symbol of Kashmiri Designers pride.

 

Buta on Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1810 1840 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. ca. 1810 – 1840.

Buta on Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Early Mid 19th Century 575x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Kashmir Shawl. Afghan Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Early – Mid 19th Century.

Buta on Kashmir Shawl. Sikh Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Buta on Kashmir Shawl. Sikh Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – c 1820-1830

Paisley Motif KashmirShawl 1820 1830 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Paisley Buta. c 1820-1830. Kashmir Design. Overwhelming demand for Kashmir Buta design Shawls from the West, Russia and Indian Royalty boosted the innovation of the kashmir shawl designs and buta motif was now a trademark which the west started to copy and imitate due to the increasing demand.

 

Complex and Sophisticated Buta Paisley on Long Kashmir Paisley Shawl. Sikh Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Complex and sophisticated Buta Paisley on Long Kashmir Paisley Shawl. Sikh-Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century.

Complex and Sophisticated Buta Paisley on Long Kashmir Paisley Shawl. Sikh Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century1 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Complex and Sophisticated Buta/Paisley on Long Kashmir Paisley Shawl. Sikh Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century.

Complex and Sophisticated Buta Paisley on Long Kashmir Paisley Shawl. Sikh Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century2 575x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Complex and Sophisticated Buta/Paisley on Long Kashmir Paisley Shawl. Sikh Period. Kashmir. Pashmina. ca. Mid 19th Century.

Paisley Buta on Kashmiri Paisley Shawls – c 1850-1870

Paisley Motif KashmirShawl 1850 1870 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Paisley Buta. c 1850-1870. Kashmir Design. Very complex designs with buta design started appearing due to the French and British influences. Buta was started to be called Paisley due to the Imitation Shawls being created in Paisley, England copying Kashmiri Designs. Also, new Paisley designs started to appear from the Jacquard looms in France and England.

 

Kashmir Paisley Shawl Shoulder Mantel. Sikh Dogra Period. ca 1845 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Kashmir Paisley Shawl – Shoulder Mantel. Sikh – Dogra Period. ca 1845.

Kashmir Paisley Shawl Shoulder Mantel. Sikh Dogra Period. 19th Century 574x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Kashmir Paisley Shawl – Shoulder Mantel. Sikh – Dogra Period. 19th Century.

Kashmir Paisley Pashmina Jamawar Shawl. Sikh Dogra Period. Kashmir. 19th Century. Suzani on Kani Woven Shawl 575x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Kashmir Paisley Pashmina Amlikar Jamawar Shawl. Sikh – Dogra Period. Kashmir. 19th Century. Suzani on Kani Woven Shawl.

Design from a shawl weavers pattern book. Acquired in Kashmir in 1881 VA Kashmir Paisley Shawl and its Enduring Contribution to the Paisley Motif

Design from a Naqqash pattern artist & shawl weaver’s pattern-book. Kashmir. ca 1881.

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Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

The time is the start of the 19th century, the place: Europe. Love is the preserve of everyone but not everyone can express their undying and unwavering love in quite the grand way elites of European royalty filled with all the opulence in the world are able to do. During this time the royal courts of Europe stood head and shoulders above all others and the women in these courts were showered with love from their suitors and husbands who often went away on epic journeys of discovery and conquest. From England to France, women had one gift at the top of their list—the Kashmir Paisley shawl. These shawls came from a far, far away land; a place rich in history, culture, and artistic superiority. Kashmir was no ordinary place and anyone who wanted to show their love for a woman at this time of unheralded change in European fashion and trade had to make the journey to this epic land.

TKC Eduard Friedrich Leybold 1798 1879 Portrait of a Young Lady in a red Dress with a Paisley 1824 813x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Painting 1 : Portrait of a young lady in a red dress with a Kashmir Paisley Shawl – Eduard Friedrich Leybold – 1824

Painting 1 illustrates the stunning detail and preferred 19th century style for wearing Kashmir Paisley shawls. Captured by Eduard Friedrich Leybold in 1824, it shows the regal nature of the time and the beauty of the paisley shawl as an accessory.

European women in particular had a romantic fling with Kashmir shawls and the mystic of the East and this lent itself well to transforming the European fashion scene to one almost dominated by fashion from that region.

Yelizaveta Demidova 1779 1818 c.1805 oil on canvas by Lefevre Robert 1755 1830 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Painting 2: Yelizaveta Demidova (1779-1818) , previously Baroness Elisabeth Alexandrovna Stroganoff, wife of Nikolai Demidov, the exceeding wealthy owner of mines and foundries in the Urals, Russia; c.1805 (oil on canvas) by Lefevre, Robert (1755-1830) – Wearing Kashmir Shawl and a dress with Kashmiri Paisley motif embroidery.

Kings, adventurers, explorers all had to ensure that on return home, the gift of love was wrapped neatly and on open, a Kashmir shawl was inside. Nothing less could do.

The super-wealthy of European gentry was also had a penchant for expressing their love with the gift of Kashmir Paisley shawls from the beautiful and respected land in the East. Nikolai Demidov, a wealthy Russian who dominated the mines and foundries of the Urals region in Russia was very fond of expressing his undying love to his wife, Yelizaveta Demidova (1779-1818). Yelizaveta who was a baroness no less had developed an exquisite taste for timeless fashion and made sure that her husband in expressing his chivalrous and unbridled passion give her nothing but Kashmir Paisley shawls embroidered with the most beautiful and timeless motifs. (Painting 2)

Kashmir had long since captured the imagination and wonder of European travelers and this proved the case with Napoleon Bonaparte when he made his journey to the East. Napoleon showered Empress Josephine, his wife, with all the love and adoration you could and often brought timeless pieces of art and fashion on his return from his long and epic journeys across the orient. In one such display we can see Empress Josephine depicted in a portrait wearing a beautiful and extravagant Kashmir shawl dotted with the beautiful and timeless motifs from the epic land of Kashmir. (Painting 3)

Empress Josephine of France by Francois Gerard 983x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Painting 3: Empress Josephine at Malmaison holding a Kashmir Shawl – 1801 – oil on canvas – Musee Nat. du Chateau de Malmaison, Rueil-Malmaison, France.

Napoleon Bonaparte’s penchant for showing his undying love to the women that came in his life transcended him and no less than his nephew, Napoleoan III, took up the magnificent mantle of bestowing Kashmir Paisley shawls to the women he loved. Doña María Eugenia Ignacia Augustina de Palafox-Portocarrero de Guzmán y Kirkpatrick, 16th Countess of Teba and 15th Marquise of Ardales gives historical significance to the wearing of Kashmiri motifs in all modes of dress ranging from beautiful and timeless shawls to dresses adorn with the artistic and mystical inspirations emanating from Kashmir. (Painting 4)

Empress Eugenie at Biarritz 1858 1024x870 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Painting 4: Doña María Eugenia Ignacia Augustina de Palafox-Portocarrero de Guzmán y Kirkpatrick, 16th Countess of Teba and 15th Marquise of Ardales (5 May 1826 – 11 July 1920), known as Eugénie de Montijo, was the last Empress consort of the French from 1853 to 1871 as the wife of Napoleon III, Emperor of the French. Oil on Canvas.

The French, Russian and British aristocracy carried on the lofty ideals of dominating high fashion, taste and class for many years and this carried through eventually to all segments of society. The Kashmir Paisley shawl became the ultimate status symbol for discerning women looking to accentuate their beauty and taste for timeless fashion and art. The Paisley motif has now transcended time and even today is still one of the most sought after design and embroidery motif on everything from shawls to scarves.

Lovers are still enamored by the timeless nature of the artistic pieces that came comes from the epic land of Kashmir and so unsurprisingly, the greatest love is expressed with the greatest gift, a timeless Kashmir Paisley shawl. Love has been around for thousands of years and the Kashmir Paisley shawl has done an immeasurable duty in keeping love alive for the last 300 years and counting.

The Paisley is a symbol of love and has its genesis in Kashmir. The Paisley shawl came to define love and gifting due to its sheer popularity among the elite. There are countless portraits created during this period showing the adoration among women for the Kashmir Paisley shawl. Everyone who was anyone had one (or many) in their wardrobe.

Here are countless examples of how royalty used Kashmir Paisley shawls as a symbol of love for the last 300 years.

Königin Pauline Württemberg wearing a Kashmir Paisley Shawl by Joseph Karl Stieler ca. 1825. She was born a Württemberg and married a Württemberg. She is holding her son Karl who married Grand Princess Olga. 673x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Königin Pauline Württemberg wearing a Kashmir Paisley Shawl . Painting by Joseph Karl Stieler – ca. 1825. She was born a Württemberg and married a Württemberg. She is holding her son Karl who married Grand Princess Olga.

 

Portrait of Catherine Worlée Princesse de Talleyrand Périgord 1804 and 1805 726x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of Catherine Worlée, Princesse de Talleyrand-Périgord with a Kashmir Paisley Shawl – portrait by François Gérard – c. 1804 and 1805

 

madame recamier by francois gerard 671x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Madame Récamier (Jeanne-Françoise Julie Adélaïde Récamier ) wrapped in a Kashmir Shawl by Francois Gérard (1802), known as Juliette, was a French society leader, whose salon drew Parisians from the leading literary and political circles of the early 19th century.

 

Merry Joseph Blondel   Felicite Louise Julie Constance de Durfort 690x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Félicité-Louise de Durfort Constance De Durfort, Marechale de Beurnonville wearing a Kashmir Paisley Shawl. c. 1808/13. Oil on Canvas -Merry-Joseph Blondel. Félicité-Louise de Durfort was the youngest daughter and namesake of Félicité, Count de Durfort, Colonel of the Dauphin’s Regiment, pre-Revolutionary French Ambassador of France to the Republic of Venice.

 

TKC Christine Boyer 3 July 1771 Saint Maximin la Sainte Baume – 14 May 1800 was a member of the Bonaparte family as the sister of Lucien Bonapartes housekeeper and then Luciens first wife by Antoine Jean Gros 1800 615x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Christine Boyer (3 July 1771, Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume – 14 May 1800) was a member of the Bonaparte family, as the sister of Lucien Bonaparte’s housekeeper and then Lucien’s first wife- by Antoine Jean Gros – 1800 – Wearing Kashmir Paisley Shawl

 

Portrait of the Empress Josephine 1805 by Pierre Paul Prudhon Oil on Canvas at Musée du Louvre Paris France 760x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of the Empress Josephine wearing a Kashmiri Shawl  – 1805 by Pierre-Paul Prud’hon, Oil on Canvas at Musée du Louvre, Paris, France

 

TKC portrait of madame riviere nee marie francoise jacquette bibiane blot de beauregard 778x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of Madame Riviere nee Marie Francoise Jacquette Bibiane Blot de Beauregard by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres – 1806 – oil on canvas – Musée du Louvre, Paris, France. Wearing Kashmiri Paisley Shawl

 

TKC Portrait of Madame de Senonnes by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres c.1814 musée des Beau Arts Nantes France Wearing a Kashmiri Paisley Shawl  800x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of Madame de Senonnes by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres – c.1814 – musée des Beau Arts, Nantes, France – Wearing a Kashmiri Paisley Shawl

 

TKC Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805 73 Portrait of Sophie of Sweden 1801 1865 Grand Duchess of Baden 1831 749x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of Sophie of Sweden (1801-1865), Grand Duchess of Baden, 1831 by Franz Xaver Winterhalter – wearing Kashmiri Paisley Shawl – 1831

 

Mary Lodge Bride of Baron Charles Louis de Keverberg de Kessel wearing Kashmir Paisley Shawl. 1818  734x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Mary Lodge, Bride of Baron Charles-Louis de Keverberg de Kessel wearing Kashmir Paisley Shawl. 1818

 

Colette Versavel Wife of Isaac J de Meye 756x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of Colette Versavel Wife of Isaac J de Meyer holding a Kashmir Paisley Shawl – by Ducq Joseph Francois – 1822.

 

TKC Portrait of Joséphina Fridrix wearing a Kashmir Paisley Shawl 1813 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of Joséphina Fridrix wearing a Kashmir Paisley Shawl – (Riesner) 1813.

 

Portrait of Madame Panckoucke wearing Kashmir Shawl. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres Musée du Louvre Paris. 1811 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of Madame Panckoucke wearing Kashmir Shawl. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres – Musée du Louvre, Paris. – 1811

 

Portrait of the Vicomtesse Vilain XIIII wearing a Kashmir Shawl and her daughter Jacques Louis David 1816 775x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of the Vicomtesse Vilain XIIII wearing a Kashmir Shawl and her daughter, Jacques Louis David – 1816.

 

Henri francois mulard ca1810 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Portrait of a lady wearing a Kashmir Shawl – Henri François Mulard. Circa 1810

 

A Mother with Two Children wearing Kashmir Paisley Shawls Chalon Alfred Edward 1815 1820 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

A Mother with Two Children wearing Kashmir Paisley Shawls – Chalon, Alfred Edward, – 1815-1820.

 

TKC  Madame Jacques Louis Leblanc nee Francoise Poncelle 1800s 791x1024 Kashmir Paisley Shawls: Defining Love for Over 300 Years

Madame Jacques-Louis Leblanc (née Françoise Poncelle, 1788–1839) by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres – Oil on Canvas – Wearing Kashmiri Shawl – 1823

( Images courtesy : Louvre Museum – France )

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